Atria-Content-Media
 

Inside Zan TV: Afghanistan’s first all-female station


2000
A camerawomen films footage for a Zan TV show. Photograph: Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock

The channel employs 50 women to create its daily mix of news, politics and lifestyle shows. In a country still recovering from Taliban rule, Zan’s team are transforming attitudes – and ratings are soaring
 

After a city-wide billboard campaign featuring a group of young women standing with arms folded, the women’s media network Zan TV launched in Kabul, Afghanistan, three months ago, with a panel discussion about the right to vote and a Facebook cover photo that read: “We mirror you all”. Zan, meaning “women” in Arabic, is the first TV station in Afghanistan to be made for and run entirely by women. It’s a radical initiative for a country where the television industry is run solely by men and where just 16 years ago, journalism and even access to education for women were banned. “We want women to have an active role in politics and society,” says Nasrine Nawa, 26, Zan’s director of news programming. “We’re empowering them to lead independent lives outside the home.”

Nawa’s mission is to train the next generation of female Afghan journalists. Fifty women aged 17 to 28 work for Zan; half are qualified, half are learning on the job. “Many trained journalists are jobless because most TV stations won’t employ women, so we do. We also want to train young women who might not have access to education because of where they live or their family,” says Nawa. Zan also employs 10 men to train women in operating cameras and editing film. It posts jobs on its Facebook page, which had an average of 8,000 likes a day in May.

The TV station was founded by the media entrepreneur Hamid Samar, who saw a gap in the market when going through dozens of job applications from women at another TV station. The Afghan media landscape is already packed, with about 70 satellite TV stations, and competition for ratings is rife. Zan’s task is to build an audience by developing cutting-edge shows on the issues affecting millennial Afghan women, such as negotiating Islam as a feminist, reproductive rights, managing finances and careers.

The most popular shows are the Daily News show hosted by Yasamin Yarmal and a weekly evening show that features conversations with radical Afghan women such as the politician and activist Fareeda Kuchi Balkhi, from Afghanistan’s nomadic Kuchi tribe. Zan also runs a daytime cookery programme on how to make speedy healthy meals. In the evening, the hour-long entertainment show In Focus recently showcased an all-female orchestra.

“What makes us stand out is that we talk about everything that has touched women’s lives,” says Nawa. “Women have been a marginalised community for so long in Afghanistan. We want to prove they have the power to take control and change their lives, if they want.”
For a new TV station, the ratings are impressive. According to Samar, an average of 90,000 people are tuning into the morning news programme.
 
Mehria Azali, 22, is a journalist and presenter at Zan. She is keen to introduce a strong female narrative to the Afghan news agenda and explore issues such as underage marriage, rape and access to education. “During the Taliban’s rule, women were wanted in the home to satisfy male needs,” she says. “Things have got better, but rights for women are still very bad, especially outside Kabul. When they watch TV, Afghan women don’t see issues that affect them being talked about. We want to change that.”

In 2015, research by the NGO Global Rights found that nearly nine out of 10 women in Afghanistan were subjected to physical, sexual or psychological violence. Now, Nawa and her team are talking directly to those women. “A lot of abuse towards women is hidden by police, so we have a whole programme about justice for women,” says Azali. She is looking for a lawyer to come in and talk about rape within marriage. “We want to lead by example of what women can be,” she says. “Increasing their economic potential by showing them a new set of options.”
 
After a city-wide billboard campaign featuring a group of young women standing with arms folded, the women’s media network Zan TV launched in Kabul, Afghanistan, three months ago, with a panel discussion about the right to vote and a Facebook cover photo that read: “We mirror you all”. Zan, meaning “women” in Arabic, is the first TV station in Afghanistan to be made for and run entirely by women.

It’s a radical initiative for a country where the television industry is run solely by men and where just 16 years ago, journalism and even access to education for women were banned.

“We want women to have an active role in politics and society,” says Nasrine Nawa, 26, Zan’s director of news programming. “We’re empowering them to lead independent lives outside the home.”
Nawa’s mission is to train the next generation of female Afghan journalists. Fifty women aged 17 to 28 work for Zan; half are qualified, half are learning on the job. “Many trained journalists are jobless because most TV stations won’t employ women, so we do. We also want to train young women who might not have access to education because of where they live or their family,” says Nawa. Zan also employs 10 men to train women in operating cameras and editing film. It posts jobs on its Facebook page, which had an average of 8,000 likes a day in May.

The TV station was founded by the media entrepreneur Hamid Samar, who saw a gap in the market when going through dozens of job applications from women at another TV station. The Afghan media landscape is already packed, with about 70 satellite TV stations, and competition for ratings is rife. Zan’s task is to build an audience by developing cutting-edge shows on the issues affecting millennial Afghan women, such as negotiating Islam as a feminist, reproductive rights, managing finances and careers. The most popular shows are the Daily News show hosted by Yasamin Yarmal and a weekly evening show that features conversations with radical Afghan women such as the politician and activist Fareeda Kuchi Balkhi, from Afghanistan’s nomadic Kuchi tribe. Zan also runs a daytime cookery programme on how to make speedy healthy meals. In the evening, the hour-long entertainment show In Focus recently showcased an all-female orchestra.

“What makes us stand out is that we talk about everything that has touched women’s lives,” says Nawa. “Women have been a marginalised community for so long in Afghanistan. We want to prove they have the power to take control and change their lives, if they want.”

For a new TV station, the ratings are impressive. According to Samar, an average of 90,000 people are tuning into the morning news programme.
 
Mehria Azali, 22, is a journalist and presenter at Zan. She is keen to introduce a strong female narrative to the Afghan news agenda and explore issues such as underage marriage, rape and access to education. “During the Taliban’s rule, women were wanted in the home to satisfy male needs,” she says. “Things have got better, but rights for women are still very bad, especially outside Kabul. When they watch TV, Afghan women don’t see issues that affect them being talked about. We want to change that.”

In 2015, research by the NGO Global Rights found that nearly nine out of 10 women in Afghanistan were subjected to physical, sexual or psychological violence. Now, Nawa and her team are talking directly to those women. “A lot of abuse towards women is hidden by police, so we have a whole programme about justice for women,” says Azali. She is looking for a lawyer to come in and talk about rape within marriage. “We want to lead by example of what women can be,” she says. “Increasing their economic potential by showing them a new set of options.”
The channel employs 50 women to create its daily mix of news, politics and lifestyle shows. In a country still recovering from Taliban rule, Zan’s team are transforming attitudes – and ratings are soaring
 


Grance Banks, The Guardian, 08/08/2017

Feedback:
(page   1   2   3   4)
Lynnlibbrecht (Guest) 15/12/2017 08:14
Thank you for your sharing. Thanks to this article I can learn more things. Expand your knowledge and abilities. Actually the article is very practical. Thank you!
https://street-view.org/

Susan-writes (Guest) 06/02/2018 07:08
I really appreciate women camera operate from Zan TV show women’s are able to handle softly any kind of work. Actually, I am a student and want to become a photographer. Really glad to see here women camera operator. http://www.aoneassignments.com/

andrewsymond (Guest) 06/02/2018 07:15
The most well-known shows are the Daily News demonstrate facilitated by Yasmin Yarmal and a week by week evening demonstrate that highlights discussions with radical Afghan ladies, for example, the government official and extremist Fareeda Kuchi Balkhi, from Afghanistan's traveling Kuchi clan
http://www.courseworkhelppros.co.uk/

charlesainsley (Guest) 06/02/2018 07:17
I will by and large accommodate A good push look Previously, to you from my bookmark support. I don't generally comment Also don't care to experience period for composing those comment. At I will by and large accommodate An average push look Previously, to you from my bookmark empower.
https://www.courseworklounge.co.uk/

geico login (Guest) 11/03/2018 12:23
geico login Geico insurance login then check out the articles published in this portal and gain the required knowledge

http://geico-insurance.co/geico-login/

mana badi.com (Guest) 27/03/2018 07:05
mana badi.com check here for results
http://imanabadi.co.in/
ChrisGreen (Guest) 03/06/2018 20:13
According to the reviews and views of people, a celebrity is the only that one which people like the most. Otherwise everyone could be called as star.
https://www.theacademicpapers.co.uk/coursework-writing-service.php
Mausam Roy (Guest) 20/07/2018 11:39
To find trustworthy and reliable packers and movers are equally as important as moving
https://assuremoving.in/packers-and-movers-surat/

Mausam Roy (Guest) 20/07/2018 11:39

thane is a capital city with a huge crowd
https://assuremoving.in/packers-and-movers-thane/
Lucy Gray (Guest) 23/07/2018 07:46
Fund box provides a common-sense history of credit ranking that gives little companies the simple and flexible funding you need to grow. Connect your QuickBooks account to Fund box in minutes, get a funding decision in efforts and get resources as soon as the next company day if accepted.
(page   1   2   3   4)

Atria-Content-Events
Tuesday 3 March
12:00amWorld Widlife Day @ United Nations HQ, UN Plaza, New York, USA, 10017
View monthly calendar